FAQ

Is this non-anesthetic cleaning as good as a dental that I get at my regular veterinarian under anesthesia?

For most dogs with mild to moderate tartar who accept the procedure, yes this cleaning is essentially the same as the one that is done under anesthesia in a veterinary office.

 

We use exactly the same ultrasonic and polishing equipment as your regular veterinarian.

 

If during the veterinary exam before the cleaning procedure it is determined that either the amount of dental disease is too great or your pet isn't a good behavioral candidate for the procedure, we will stop and refer you back to your regular veterinarian for an anesthetic dental cleaning.

How can you clean my pet's teeth without anesthetic when my own vet can't?

We have spent a lot of time perfecting the non-anesthetic teeth cleaning procedure. Through blanket swaddling and other "fear-free" techniques the vast majority of our pets can have their routine tartar and gingivitis cleaned without having to undergo general anesthesia.

You say that my pet should be 100% healthy for the procedure. Why? is it dangerous?

You say that my pet should be 100% healthy for the procedure. Why? Is it dangerous?

So call and make an appointment TODAY! 

360-388-1094

Din is a popular choice on business and tech sites. It's also a good font for creating page titles with impact.

FAQ

Is this non-anesthetic cleaning as good as a dental that I get at my regular veterinarian under anesthesia?

How can you clean my pet's teeth without anesthetic when my own vet can't?

We have spent a lot of time perfecting the non-anesthetic teeth cleaning procedure. Through blanket swaddling and other "fear-free" techniques the vast majority of our pets can have their routine tartar and gingivitis cleaned without having to undergo general anesthesia.

You say that my pet should be 100% healthy for the procedure. Why? is it dangerous?

You say that my pet should be 100% healthy for the procedure. Why? Is it dangerous?

But one of the reasons I want a non-anesthetic dental is because my pet has a chronic condition that makes anesthesia dangerous for my pet. Can they get the non-anesthetic dental?

FAQ

Click on a question to go to the answer or simply scroll down...

Questions & Answers

Why is dental heath important for my dog?

Besides the stinky breath associated with dental disease/tartar/plaque, tiny amounts of bacteria leak from the teeth into the irritated gums then into the bloodstream. This bacteria can harm the heart, lungs, liver and kidneys. Causing silent, long term damage.

This is why humans brush their teeth twice daily and between snacks. Unfortunately, our pets don't have opposable thumbs and even the most dedicated owner has a hard time brushing even every third day, let alone daily. So tartar builds up and bacteria leaks into our pet's blood stream.

The old school approach was to do an anesthetic dental every few years, however that left bacteria leaking into the bloodstream most of the time. It was hard to justify anesthesia more frequently than that.

With non-anesthetic teeth cleaning, we can do the procedure every six months (sometimes more frequently if indicted by tartar build-up) safely and without the significant consequences of frequent anesthesia while keeping the bacteria at bay.

Is this non-anesthetic cleaning as good as a dental that I get at my regular veterinarian under anesthesia?

For most dogs with mild to moderate tartar who accept the procedure, yes this cleaning is essentially the same as the one that is done under anesthesia in a veterinary office.

 

We use exactly the same ultrasonic and polishing equipment as your regular veterinarian.

 

If during the veterinary exam before the cleaning procedure it is determined that either the amount of dental disease is too great or your pet isn't a good behavioral candidate for the procedure, we will stop and refer you back to your regular veterinarian for an anesthetic dental cleaning.

How can you clean my pet's teeth without anesthetic when my own vet can't?

We have spent a lot of time perfecting the non-anesthetic teeth cleaning procedure. Through blanket swaddling and other "fear-free" techniques the vast majority of our pets can have their routine tartar and gingivitis cleaned without having to undergo general anesthesia.

If it is so easy, why can't I just scrap the tartar off at home?

We never said it was easy, just that we at Clean Fangs were proficient at it. In addition, just scraping the tartar off leaves micro-gouges in the enamel, which actually encourage bacteria to take hold again. This is why that we at Clean Fangs and your veterinarian in clinic, use ultrasonic scalers, which do far less damage to the enamel, and polish once we are done to restore that nice smooth surface that helps to repel bacteria.

You say you do non-anesthetic dentals yet you recommend sedative for some pets? What's up with that? Is it non-anesthetic or not?

Anesthesia, like the kind your pet receives at your regular veterinarian is putting your animal completely unconscious. The side effects of this is a lowering of blood pressure and a host of other side effects of full anesthesia. A sedative is just that. While your pet shouldn't drive at night under a sedative, it is fully conscious during the procedure. Some pets just do better with the "edge" taken off. Just a little medication to make them calmer so the procedure goes as smoothly as possible.

 
 
 
 
 

You say that my pet should be 100% healthy for the procedure. Why? Is it dangerous?

 

While non-anesthetic dental cleaning is an extremely safe procedure (after thousands of cleanings Dr. McCray has not had a single fatality, nor even a pet have to be hospitalized after the procedure. As a matter of fact she's seen more negative side effects from nail trims than from a non-anesthetic dental cleaning), it is stressful. Like nail trims and anal gland expressions, any time you restrain an animal, it is stressful. Of course your pet doesn't want their teeth cleaned. Heck, I don't even like it when I have my teeth cleaned.  You just never know how much stress an individual pet can handle so we like them as healthy as possible before the procedure so that they sail through it without any problems!

Let's say that your pet was sneezing before the cleaning then started sneezing worse after the dental, was the sneeze naturally going to get worse or was it the procedure that created the worsening of the sneeze? That's why we want your pet 100% healthy before the procedure!

But one of the reasons I want a non-anesthetic dental is because my pet has a chronic disease and an anesthetic dental is too dangerous. Can my pet get the procedure?

 

That depends on the type of chronic condition and how under control the disease is.

Heart murmurs: If the veterinarian feels the murmur is stable and the lung fields are clear, they may approve the procedure, but you must approve antibiotics since we are releasing bacteria into the blood stream (just like when you get your teeth cleaned and when your pet gets an anesthetic dental)

Liver/Cushings/Diabetes disease: As long as the veterinarian feels the condition is under medical control, they may approve the procedure, however you must approve antibiotics before the procedure can be started.

Other Chronic conditions: It will be up to the veterinarian's judgement whether or not the procedure is safe. If ever the veterinarian feels it is unsafe, the procedure will NOT be done. The veterinarian has the final say.

On your services page, you state my pet may need antibiotics. Why?

 

There are many factors that go into the veterinarian deciding that antibiotics are necessary for your pet. Their age, medical condition and the amount of tartar and gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) all play a factor.

When we clean the teeth, bacteria is cleaned off, but some does go into the bloodstream. Normally young, healthy pets can handle this addition of bacteria with their immune system. However if your pet's immune system seems compromised, or there is a risk that bacteria can land somewhere dangerous (abnormal heart value), or there is simply so much bacteria and inflammation in the mouth that too much bacteria will be released, your approval of antibiotics will be necessary before we can start the procedure.

On your services page, you state my pet may need anti-inflammatory medication. Why?

There are many factors that go into the veterinarian deciding that anti-inflammatory meds may be are necessary for your pet. Their age, medical condition and the amount of tartar and gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) all play a factor.

The veterinarian determines how sore the gums will be after the cleaning. If it is nothing more than we would feel after a dental cleaning, anti-inflammatories won't be necessary. However if the veterinarian determines that the gums will be very sore, you will need to approve anti-inflammatories before the procedure can be done.

Another example of your pet needing anti-inflammatories would be if your pet has stiffness from arthritis and is not already under treatment. Positioning the pet on their back can sometimes be ouchy for our older pets with arthritis and may need some meds to make them feel better after the procedure.

As always, we want your pet to be as comfortable as possible both during the procedure and after!

More questions? Just call us at 360-388-1904!